Electronic tension head

Hawk Electronic Tension Head

  1. What is the difference between the Hawk electronic tension head and Silent Partner electric tension head?
  2. Which circuitry does the Silent Partner use for his electric tensioner?
  3. How is the performance of Silent Partner electric tensioner?
  4. Beware of Silent Partner utilizing its FAQ#4 contents to mislead the viewers.

  1. What is the difference between the Hawk electronic tension head and Silent Partner electric tension head?

    The Hyper tension head is the electronic tension head, which makes stringing much faster and easier:

    The Silent Partner tension head is the electric tension head:

    1999 to 2001 model:

    Present model:



  2. Which circuitry does the Silent Partner use for his electric tensioner?

    The Silent Partnerís electric tensioner design (U.S. Patent No. 6,162,139) just uses the General Electric universal motor-speed control circuitry. Refer to the Figure 12-18 of the 1993 Small Electric Motors textbook.



    Table 1 illustrates the comparison between the Silent Partnerís String Tensioning Device and the General Electric universal motor-speed control circuitry.

    Table 1

    DeviceGeneral Electric universal motor-speed control circuitry (Figure 12-18)Silent Partner' String Tensioning Device (U.S. Patent 6,162,139 Figure 2)
    Potentiometer R1250K Ohms100K Ohms
    Capacitor C10.1 Micro Farad0.068 Micro Farad
    Resistor R2100 Ohms1500 Ohms
    Capacitor C20.1 Micro Farad0.068 Micro Farad
    Control Devices1 Diac and 1 Triac1 Quadrac: One Quadrac device is one Triac that includes a Diac mounted inside the same package. See the Quadrac data sheet of the Triac manufacturer "Teccor Electronics".

    1. The Silent Partner just changes the values of the capacitors and resistors from this General Electric universal motor-speed control circuitry. The Silent Partner even uses the identical reference designation, such as R1, C1, R2, C2. The Silent Partner uses the Quadrac as the control device in his Figure 2 of U.S. Patent No. 6,162,139. One Quadrac is equal to one Diac and one Triac. Therefore, the Silent Partner just uses the General Electric universal motor-speed control circuitry.
    2. The Silent Partner just uses the General Electric universal motor-speed control circuitry, which is public knowledge.
    3. The Triac website of the Triac manufacturer "Teccor Electronics" indicates that typical applications include motor speed controls, heater controls and incandescent light controls.
    4. The application notes AN1003 of the Triac manufacturer "Teccor Electronics" provides the explanation of the Diac-Traiac phase control. Also it indicates that several speed control and light dimming (phase) control circuits have been presented in this application notes.
    5. For complete information of the Silent Partnerís electric tensioner (U.S. Patent No. 6,162,139), please view the website of the United States Patent and Trademark Office.

  3. How is the performance of Silent Partner electric tensioner?

    A professional stringer, Thomas E. Ruddy, tests a Silent Partner 2002 e.stringer.

    Tenion pulled to correct tension most of the time, but lost more # than I thought it should. When tension pulled not enough stable or constant pulled to have a even racket strung. I have strung for the US Davis Cup team. I have also strung for school districts in and out California, Montebello, Whittier, San Jose, San Luis Obispo, San Diego, New York Germantown middle school district. Also US badminton team 84-88, 92 Olympic teams, to present 2002.

    Machine Under Test: 2002 September e.Stringer model (purchased in September 2002)
    Test Equipment: Silent Partner tension calibrator (purchased in September 2002)
    Silent Partner Original Syn 16G string (purchased in September 2002)
    Initial Setup (Calibration):Follow the HELPFUL HINT FOR CALIBRATION on page 9 of the Owner's manual:
    1. Set the reference tension to 55 lb.
    2. The tension indicated on the calibrator is 51 lb after waiting for 3 seconds.
    3. Reposition the tension selector knob to point to 51 lb.

    Test report

    Reference TensionInitial Pull Tension3 Second Later Tension10 Second Later Tension
    30 LBS27 LBS25 LBS21 LBS
    30 LBS26 LBS25 LBS24 LBS
    30 LBS28 LBS25 LBS23 LBS
    30 LBS30 LBS26 LBS25 LBS
    30 LBS30 LBS26 LBS22 LBS
    35 LBS32 LBS25 LBS20 LBS
    35 LBS32 LBS28 LBS24 LBS
    35 LBS35 LBS30 LBS18 LBS
    35 LBS35 LBS31 LBS28 LBS
    35 LBS35 LBS30 LBS26 LBS
    40 LBS40 LBS36 LBS35 LBS
    40 LBS40 LBS36 LBS36 LBS
    40 LBS36 LBS35 LBS34 LBS
    40 LBS40 LBS36 LBS35 LBS
    40 LBS41 LBS39 LBS36 LBS
    45 LBS46 LBS41 LBS40 LBS
    45 LBS43 LBS39 LBS36 LBS
    45 LBS44 LBS40 LBS36 LBS
    45 LBS44 LBS40 LBS37 LBS
    45 LBS44 LBS39 LBS36 LBS
    50 LBS50 LBS46 LBS45 LBS
    50 LBS49 LBS44 LBS43 LBS
    50 LBS49 LBS44 LBS41 LBS
    50 LBS49 LBS46 LBS41 LBS
    50 LBS50 LBS46 LBS41 LBS
    55 LBS57 LBS52 LBS51 LBS
    55 LBS56 LBS51 LBS50 LBS
    55 LBS56 LBS51 LBS49 LBS
    55 LBS56 LBS50 LBS49 LBS
    55 LBS56 LBS50 LBS48 LBS
    60 LBS62 LBS59 LBS55 LBS
    60 LBS65 LBS58 LBS56 LBS
    60 LBS66 LBS61 LBS60.5 LBS
    60 LBS66 LBS59 LBS56 LBS
    60 LBS66 LBS59 LBS56 LBS
    65 LBS70 LBS64 LBS60.5 LBS
    65 LBS70 LBS64 LBS61 LBS
    65 LBS70 LBS62 LBS60 LBS
    65 LBS69 LBS61 LBS60 LBS
    65 LBS71 LBS62 LBS60.25 LBS
    70 LBS76 LBS67 LBS66 LBS
    70 LBS76 LBS69 LBS66 LBS
    70 LBS76 LBS69 LBS65.5 LBS
    70 LBS77 LBS68 LBS66 LBS
    70 LBS79 LBS70.5 LBS70 LBS

    Constant Pull Test Report

    Reference TensionInitial Pull Tension3 Second Later Tension10 Second Later TensionTension Drop to Re-trigger Motor PullMotor Pulls Tension
    30 LBS30 LBS24 LBS22 LBS  
    30 LBS31 LBS25 LBS24 LBS8 LBS16 LBS
    40 LBS40 LBS32 LBS31 LBS16 LBS25.5 LBS
    40 LBS40.5 LBS35 LBS31 LBS16 LBS25 LBS
    50 LBS50 LBS41 LBS39 LBS26 LBS39 LBS
    50 LBS50 LBS41 LBS40 LBS26 LBS39 LBS
    55 LBS56 LBS46 LBS45 LBS25 LBS55 LBS
    55 LBS56 LBS45 LBS41 LBS30 LBS45 LBS
    60 LBS61 LBS56 LBS55 LBS30 LBS46 LBS
    60 LBS61 LBS55 LBS54 LBS36 LBS49 LBS

    Test By Thomas E. Ruddy
    Date: 10-13-02

    If you have the Silent Partner e.Stringer, please let us know how is your e.Stringer performance.

  4. Beware of Silent Partner utilizing its FAQ#4 contents to mislead the viewers.

    Silent Partner's FAQ#4:

    4)    Are all electronic machines based on the same technology?

    Important differences distinguish the technologies used in various electronic machines. There are three types of technologies. The first consists of electronics for direct torque control of a motor so that the motor cannot pull more than the desired tension. Silent Partner holds a patent for this technology (US Patent #6,162,139) and offers it exclusively on the e.Stringer, the e.Stringer CL and the e.Stringer FL, as well as in retrofit tensioners for other brands of machines. The second type of electronic technology consists of a motor control linked mechanically to a pre-loaded spring. Tension adjustment is effected by turning a knob that compresses the spring to the desired tension so that a limit switch is tripped and the motor is stopped when the tension is reached. This type of control, which is identified by a tension control knob located to the right of the machine (see picture), does not provide constant pull because tension has to drop by more than 15 lbs. for the limit switch to turn the motor on again, and this does not normally happen during stringing...

    A professional stringer, Thomas E. Ruddy, tests a Silent Partner 2002 e.stringer.

    Tenion pulled to correct tension most of the time, but lost more # than I thought it should. When tension pulled not enough stable or constant pulled to have a even racket strung. I have strung for the US Davis Cup team. I have also strung for school districts in and out California, Montebello, Whittier, San Jose, San Luis Obispo, San Diego, New York Germantown middle school district. Also US badminton team 84-88, 92 Olympic teams, to present 2002.

    Constant Pull Test Report

    Reference TensionInitial Pull Tension3 Second Later Tension10 Second Later TensionTension Drop to Re-trigger Motor PullMotor Pulls Tension
    30 LBS30 LBS24 LBS22 LBS  
    30 LBS31 LBS25 LBS24 LBS8 LBS16 LBS
    40 LBS40 LBS32 LBS31 LBS16 LBS25.5 LBS
    40 LBS40.5 LBS35 LBS31 LBS16 LBS25 LBS
    50 LBS50 LBS41 LBS39 LBS26 LBS39 LBS
    50 LBS50 LBS41 LBS40 LBS26 LBS39 LBS
    55 LBS56 LBS46 LBS45 LBS25 LBS55 LBS
    55 LBS56 LBS45 LBS41 LBS30 LBS45 LBS
    60 LBS61 LBS56 LBS55 LBS30 LBS46 LBS
    60 LBS61 LBS55 LBS54 LBS36 LBS49 LBS

    Test By Thomas E. Ruddy
    Date: 10-13-02

    Refer to the complete test report.